Archive for February, 2013

Has the Mental Health Conversation Slowed?

Written by NAMI Stark County on . Posted in Uncategorized

One mental health blogger who goes by the moniker Bipolar Bandit asked a question that has been on our minds as well.  Now that some time has passed since the issue of mental health care was forced into our collective cultural awareness after another tragic act of violence, have the issues once again slipped our minds?

“It seems like everyone has gone back to living life and forgotten, once again, that we have a serious problem in the United States regarding how we treat people with mental illnesses. President Obama’s ideas of how to change things in regards to mental illness is a start, but nowhere near what we need to do.  Starting programs to help children and training teachers is just not enough.” Bipolar Bandit

Among the issues she raises are the following:

  • The problems that people with mental illnesses face are:
  • There are not enough beds in psychiatric hospitals so oftentimes people who need help are turned away.
  • The amount of psychiatrists is dwindling and therefore, it can take months before you can see a doctor.
  • If someone is in crisis, they need help now.. They can’t wait until there is a bed open or a doctor who can see them.
  • There needs to be more outpatient facilities for people who need help.
  • Steps need to be taken to help erase the stigma & raise awareness.

See the full essay here. Is the Talk about Mental Illness Regarding Recent Shootings Over?

We would love to hear your thoughts.

Finding Truth about Bipolar Disorder through Fiction

Written by NAMI Stark County on . Posted in Uncategorized

From NAMI: “Juliann Garey’s debut novel Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See is the story of Greyson Todd, a successful Hollywood studio executive, and his battle with bipolar disorder. Garey, a journalist, screenwriter, and editor of Voices of Bipolar Disorder: The Healing Companion, pulls from her personal experiences with bipolar disorder as she describes Greyson’s plight. Some of her vivid depictions are disturbing and painful to read, but in the end, Garey leaves the reader feeling compassion and hope for Greyson and those like him.” Click here to read the full story.

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